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Brian Edward Millett

Where all things beautiful collide

I discovered a new fashion designer recently as I was reviewing the spring collections.  Mary Katrantzou showed last fall during London Fashion Week, and even though it wasn’t her first time, she was someone fresh to me.  Her printed dresses and separates depicting photographs of symmetrically organized interiors fascinated me and reminded me of something, but what?  Oh yes, the work of german-based photographer Candida Hofer, who I have liked for some time, popped into my mind.  Her photographs of spaces all grand in scale seem to have been transformed onto the fabric creations of Katrantzou.  Hofer has traveled the globe taking splendid shots of libraries from New York  to Europe, large dining spaces, theaters, and more.  These pictures are then turned into prints almost as grand as the spaces in them.  Interior Designers like Jeffrey Bilhuber, and stylemakers and collectors like Frederic Fekkai and his wife Shirin von Wulffen have chosen these large works to hang on the walls of their homes.  Whether you choose to wear a dress by Mary Katrantzou or start collecting the beautiful photographs of Candida Hofer, I believe you will always look at them and wear them with great fondness and delight!

dress by Mary Katrantzou

photograph by Candida Hofer

The New York Public Library in full use with its gleaming tile floors, thanks in part to the magnificent daylight coming through the arched windows.  The restored mural ceiling and grand suspended lights help create a magical place to read and learn.

Mary Katrantzou
photograph by Candida Hofer

One of my favorite New York spaces, now home in part to Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, is Lincoln Center and the stunning home of the Metropolitan Opera.  Hofer’s photos show how truly fantastic these spaces are.

dress by Mary Katrantzou
photograph by Candida Hofer

A more typically proportioned shot by Hofer, this perfectly symmetrical library is a reader’s dream.  Does it even end?

Mary Katrantzou
dining room by Robert Couturier

The New York dining room of hair icon Frederic Fekkai and his wife is a true place of beauty.  A futuristic table is surrounded by classic chairs, with an Herve van der Straeten light fixture suspended above.  A large Candida Hofer photograph fills one wall and makes the dining space appear even bigger.

dress by Mary Katrantzou
photograph by Candida Hofer

The theater itself takes center stage in this Hofer piece.  Unlike the New York Public Library, this ornate theater in the round is not occupied, but instead works with the photographer one on one.

dress by Mary Katrantzou

Katrantzou plays up the photographic print of this dress in a fun, but chic way with a necklace designed to mimic a chandelier hovering over the dining table in the picture.  www.marykatrantzou.com

photograph by Candida Hofer

Another symmetrical shot by Hofer of an insanely large dining space.  This photo is more subdued in its palette with all the white linens and one million chairs (kidding).  Guess who’s coming to dinner?  Me!!

dress by Mary Katrantzou

Fringe in this dress (a fashion trend I’m loving) takes drapery in the printed fabric and continues it down the body.

dining room by Jeffrey Bilhuber

A Connecticut dining room designed by Jeffrey Bilhuber is already striking with its coats upon coats of brown lacquer on the walls, and pretty upholstered chairs.  The photo on the wall is what I believe to be a Candida Hofer piece, this one focusing on a room’s interaction with people.  Might I point out that the tabletop that Bilhuber created is also much like a work of art, but of a still life variety.

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